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Engineering

The Engineering department is constantly evolving to reflect the ever changing nature of the industry we are preparing students for. We aim to stimulate and encourage students of all capabilities and at every opportunity helping to ignite what we hope will become a lifelong passion for all thing engineered.  

An innovative and successful range of projects support the knowledge base that will allow a deeper understanding of the subject.  Our staff are industrially trained and bring this knowledge and passion to continuously motivate all the students to aim to not only reach their goal but develop a new way of thinking. 

Head of Design Technology: Mrs S Derwent

Head of Engineering: Mr J Shergold

The department includes one large and very well equipped Engineering room. It is equipped with an interactive whiteboard and visualises. Along with all the machinery you would expect to find in an industrial engineering firm including a full size metal lathe and milling machine. In addition to the abundant laptops in the school there is a spacious IT facility ‘Technosnake’ outside the Engineering room. The use of computers is embedded across the subject, whether it be for design, manufacture of products, research, display or assessment purposes. The department is well resourced with a wide range of specialist materials, machines and hand tools.

Within the Design and Technology Department pupils are prepared to enable them to take part in tomorrow's rapidly changing technologies.  They are given the skills and opportunity to develop an understanding of Technical Drawing as the bedrock of the subject and from this they can explore each element of a products make up in turn from material selection through to manufacturing tolerance.  The subject appeals for pupils to become independent and imaginative problem solvers, both as individuals and members of a team.  They must look for needs, wants and opportunities, and respond to them by developing a range of ideas and making products, systems and solutions.  They are encouraged to relate practical skills with a deep understanding of function and industrial practices. 

Engineering is a practical subject taught in the Engineering workshop. Students must be aware this subject requires a strong knowledge and working understanding of maths and physics, due to 25% of the syllabus and exam being maths and physics based.

Teaching involves:

  • practical demonstrations and use of technical equipment
  • class discussions, brainstorming, research
  • working individually and in small groups
  • using case studies, surveys, guest speakers
  • Industrial links and competitions through local companies like BAE
  • Self and peer evaluation.

Supported through Key Stage 3

Engineering is not taught as a specific subject in key stage three but large parts of the Design and Technology syllabus support their basic understanding of the key skills required. In the department our aim is to give students an understanding of the need for, and requirement of, well-designed and manufactured products in all aspects of modern society. We hope to develop a broad knowledge and understanding of all aspects of the subject and develop the practical skills that are going to allow them to progress in whatever direction they choose.


Engineering in Years 9, 10 & 11

The Engineering department has developed into an exciting place to be. A dynamic and innovative environment, we continuously push the boundaries in order to stimulate and encourage students of all capabilities to experience and contribute in the subject at every opportunity.

Within the Design and Technology staff as a whole are passionate about their subject, bringing years of industrial experience to the classroom to continuously motivate all the students to aim to reach beyond what they believe they are capable of. The department includes a very well-resourced engineering workshop and access to design and ICT suites. The use of computers is embedded across the subject, whether it be for design, manufacture of products, research, display or assessment purposes. The department is well resourced with a wide range of specialist materials, machinery and hand tools.

Within the Design and Technology Department pupils are prepared to enable them to take part in tomorrow's rapidly changing technologies.  They are encouraged to think and involve themselves creatively to improve quality of life.  The subject appeals for pupils to become independent and imaginative problem solvers, both as individuals and members of a team.  They must look for needs, wants and opportunities, and respond to them by developing a range of ideas and making products, systems and solutions.  They are encouraged to relate practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social and environmental issues, function and industrial practices. 

Engineering is a practical subject with a high physics and maths content which involves:

  • practical demonstrations and use of technical equipment
  • class discussions, brainstorming and research
  • working individually and in small groups to research and develop engineering solutions
  • working to industry standard engineering drawings to manufacture products from a range of materials.
  • Working with a range of machinery and materials to produce a prototype
  • self-evaluation

 

Throughout Key Stage 4 pupils undertake a range of projects that will allow them to gradually expand their understanding of the subject and its specific requirements. This is tied in to a syllabus that compliments the projects with the theoretical understanding and skills required to excel.

Students will find themselves developing an understanding through Year 9 and 10 which will allow them to reach their potential in Year 11.


Year 9

In Year 9 students will follow a timetable that comprises of three theory and two practical lessons per fortnight. Over the year students will cover:

Section Focus Content Requirement
Ferrous metals and alloys including cast iron, low and high carbon steels and steel alloys (stainless steel).

Students will be able to show an understanding of how the mechanical properties of these metals can change through

  • The addition of materials to form alloys, methods which affect the grain size (heating)
  • cold working
  • hardening and quenching
  • corrosion
  • addition and subtraction of carbon in steels.
Non-ferrous metals and alloys including aluminium, copper, lead, zinc, brass and bronze.
Thermoplastics, Thermosetting polymers Students will be able to show an understanding of polymers and the effects of heat on thermosets and thermoplastics.
Composites Including Fibre reinforced polymers and glass reinforced plastic.  This also includes Plywood, MDF, OSB and Structural concrete.

Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how the mechanical properties of these materials can change through the:

  • direction/alignment of reinforcement matrix in which the reinforcement is placed
  • amount of reinforcement used
  • size and shape of reinforcement.
Cost, availability, form and supply of metals, alloys, polymers, composites and other materials including the calculation of costs to manufacture/ produce items. Students will be able to understand how the available stock sizes and supply effect manufacturing using economies of scale to reduce costs and waste produced.
The ability of engineering materials to be machined, treated, shaped and recycled. Students will be familiar with these concepts in relation to the materials covered in the course.
Engineering manufacturing processes including additive manufacturing and material removal. Students will be familiar with modern modelling techniques including Fused deposition printing, Sintering and Rapid prototyping. This will be alongside more traditional methods such as Cutting, Turning, Milling, Drilling and Chemical etching.
The shaping, casting and moulding of material.

Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how materials can be shaped by forming and manipulation including

  • bending
  • folding
  • press forming
  • composite lay up
  • punching
  • stamping Pressure die casting
  • Sand casting
  • Injection moulding
The joining and assembly methods commonly found in industry.

Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Permanent and temporary joining methods including

  • Rivets
  • threaded fastenings
  • soldering
  • brazing
  • welding
The heat and chemical treatment of materials including their Surface finishing

Students will be familiar with the treatment of metals including

  • Normalising
  • Annealing
  • Hardening
  • Quenching
  • Painting
  • Dip coating
  • Electroplating
  • Galvanising
  • Polishing.

Year 10

In Year 10 students will again follow a timetable that comprises of three theory and two practical lessons per fortnight. This builds on the learning of year 9 further developing skills and understanding. Over the year students will cover:

Section Title Content
Energy production methods including wind, solar, tidal, nuclear, fossil fuels and biomass. Students will be able to understand the benefits and drawbacks of each of the energy production methods listed including any possible environmental impact.
Engineered lifespans and The need for and methods of maintenance of engineered products.

Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Planned obsolescence along with the maintenance requirements of engineered products to:

  • ensure safety in operation
  • enable efficiency of operation

They will also look into the reasons for lubrication

  • avoiding corrosion
  • compensating for wear
End of Life (EOL), disposal and recovery of materials.
How user requirements affect material choice and manufacturing process Students will be aware of customer requirements that may necessitate solutions that are higher strength or lower weight and the ramifications this can have on the manufacturing processes.
Systems including structural, Pneumatic, electronic and mechanical. Students will be able to understand how systems are developed and implemented including system block diagrams (input, process and output), schematic drawings and flow charts.
Testing and investigation Modelling and calculating and quality control methods including aerodynamics.
The impact of modern technologies

The use of new and emerging technologies and the impact of engineering industries in relation to

  • Production
  • Society
  • the environment

Year 11

Year 11 is broken down into one theory lesson with an emphasis on exam technique and preparation and 4 hours working towards their non examined assessment (one major project based on a brief set by the exam board published each year at the end of Year 10).


KS5

Whilst Engineering is not taught at All Saints’ Academy for Year 12 & 13, many students who study Engineering stay and further their studies in this field with A Level Product Design.